A natural process

 

A natural process that each of us can explore through own experience…

We want to avoid discomfort. This makes sense in an evolutionary perspective since discomfort – or pain – often is associated with something that is harmful to our human self.

We try out different approaches to avoid discomfort, including through avoiding certain situations and also resist experience. Sometimes, we also – accidentally or not – allow experience.

Through noticing, over time, the effects of resisting and allowing experience, we notice that resistance=discomfort and allowing=release of discomfort.

Even a slight resistance to experience brings discomfort, while allowing experience, wholeheartedly and in a heartfelt way, as it is, as if it would never change, brings a release of identification out of content of experience. It is all allowed, and even welcomed and appreciated, including the resistance itself. And here, there is often a sense of a nurturing fullness, independent of what the content of experience may be.

We explore this in daily life, and possibly through certain practices such as shikantaza, headlessness, Big Mind process and more. We may notice that allowing experience also invites in a healing and maturing of our human self, and makes it easier for what we are to notice itself. (The healing comes from a falling away of the drama and struggle, and also from being with experience with receptivity and heart. The maturing from allowing any experience, including resistance. The noticing of what we are from releasing identification out of content of experience.)

We naturally and quite appropriately have a certain aim for allowing experience, such as releasing discomfort or inviting in healing/maturing and awakening. This aim serves as a very useful reminder for allowing experience. Yet within that allowing, the aim too is allowed as it is. There is a release of identification out of that particular content of experience as well.

And as there is more familiarity with allowing content of experience, it feeds back to how content of experience – including intentions – appear in general. Recognized as always free from an “I”.

It is all an innocent and natural process, and unfolds – it seems – through an ongoing sincerity and curiosity in exploring the dynamics as they show up here and now.

Outline…

  • wanting to avoid discomfort (makes sense evolutionary)
  • try out different approaches, resisting experience, accidentally allow experience
  • recongize that resistance=discomfort and allowing=release of discomfort
  • explore it (see that also invites in healing/maturing + noticing what we are)
  • then allow any aim as well along with any other content of experience (aim=resistance, aim for avoiding discomfort, for healing/maturing, awakening, etc.)
  • innocent, natural process, one phase naturally follows from the previous one

We naturally and quite appropriately have a certain aim for allowing experience, such as releasing discomfort or invite in healing/maturing and awakening. This aim serves a reminder to shift into allowing experience, and is then allowed along with any other content of experience.

From experiencing it as “I aim to … through allowing experience”, we see it as just an intention triggering the shift, living its own life, on its own time, just as any other content of experience.

Initially, we may identify with this aim before we shift into allowing experience and this can be experienced as “I aim to… through this shift”. Yet within that shift, identification is released out of it and it is seen as just part of content of experience in general, as just an aim without an “I” inherent in it.

Initially, we may identify with this aim before we shift into allowing experience and then release identification out of it as it is allowed along with content of experience in general. In time, even that may change as there is a growing familiarity with intentions too as just content of experience, and a release of identification out of this content of experience.

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