Do not rebel like that rebellious house; open your mouth and eat what I give you

 

But you, son of man, listen to what I say to you. Do not rebel like that rebellious house; open your mouth and eat what I give you.”

Then I looked, and I saw a hand stretched out to me. In it was a scroll, which he unrolled before me. On both sides of it were written words of lament and mourning and woe.

And he said to me, “Son of man, eat what is before you, eat this scroll; then go and speak to the house of Israel.” So I opened my mouth, and he gave me the scroll to eat.

Then he said to me, “Son of man, eat this scroll I am giving you and fill your stomach with it.” So I ate it, and it tasted as sweet as honey in my mouth.

Ezekiel 2:8 – 3:2

Bible verses can of course be interpreted to (appear to) support just about any point. For me, reading these verses in isolation, I see a beautiful description of what happens when we “eat” our lament and mourning and woe.

I start out rebellious. I argue against reality. I resist experience. I want things to be different from what they are. (According to my story of it.)

I am invited to eat my lament and mourning and woe. (Meet it. Be with it. Feel it. Welcome it.)

And when I do, I find – to my surprise – that it tastes as sweet as honey in my mouth.

I find that it is not what it appeared to be when I resisted it. It appeared horrifying as long as I resisted meeting, feeling and welcoming it. But when I do, there is a sweetness, comfort, receptivity and nurturing fullness there.

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2 thoughts to “Do not rebel like that rebellious house; open your mouth and eat what I give you”

  1. Hi, I am new to your blog, but have enjoyed what I have found. I liked this post, especially as I came to you when looking at ‘best Buddhist blogs’. I like you are able to use items from different types of thought to make your point. A little like Tolle does in his book, The New Earth. Have you read it? He also brings different religious thought into his points, and speaks a bit about resistence. I agree that once you stop resisting life, often it is not as bad as you imagine, easier to get through, or brings up options for changing what is to get to somewhere better. (love the picture too!)

  2. Thank you, Paula.

    I know about Eckhart Tolle, and watched some of the episodes with him and Oprah. Seems that his greatest gift – to all of us – is in being able to reach a lot of people.

    The drawing is by William Blake.

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