Asking helpful questions

 

The right questions can lead us to a great deal of insight.

For instance, if we assume the woman in this illusion is not actually cut in half….

Where must her real legs be?

If the legs sticking out at the other end are not her real legs, what may they be instead?

Why is her head moving at times when there is no apparent reason for it? Why is her neck in an awkward position while the sections are separated?

And some additional questions: If the legs are where they must be, does it look like there is enough space there? Is it a coincidence that they put down and lift up the box covering her legs differently than the box covering her upper body? If the legs sticking out at the end are not her real legs, how do they move?

And some more leading questions: If her legs are still attached to her body, they are not outside of the box, and we can see the right side of her upper body through the window, where must they be? Does that fit with the awkward angle on her neck? If she has to reposition before just before separating and bringing the sections together, does that fit with the type and timing of the movements of her head and neck? What technology did they have in the 70s for moving things remotely?

In illusionism, we may be baffled. Our mind is stopped in its tracks and don’t even know where to start looking. Or we may be mislead (by others or ourselves) and start with false assumptions or look in the wrong places.

But the right questions at the right time and met with the right attitude, can be very helpful.

And it is the same with inquiry into the nature of our experience and self-inquiry.

The right questions at the right time guide our attention and invite us to explore for ourselves.

And if met with honesty and sincerity from us, an investigation in immediate experience, and receptivity to feedback from reality or a teacher, we may indeed discover not only the dynamics of samsara, but also what we really are.

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outline….

  • questions
    • illusions
      • may be baffled or misdirected
        • baffled, mind stopped in its tracks, don’t know where to start exploring
        • misdirected so start with misleading assumptions or look in the wrong place
          • sherlock holmes: There is nothing as deceptive as an obvious fact
      • but the right questions can lead lead us to a great deal of insight
        • even the guidance from Sherloc Holmes: When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth
        • what is impossible here? if she is not split in two, and her legs are not outside of the box, where must her legs be? etc.
    • same with self-inquiry
      • questions guide attention, invites us to expore for ourselves
      • can be open ended or leading
      • requires honesty and sincerity from us, investigating immediate experience, and receptivity to guidance from reality and/or teacher

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