Thought and energy

 

Thoughts can give me a sense of drained energy, or they can be energizing. And this seems to depend on their content, and more importantly, how I relate to them.

In general, when I take a story as true, it will drain my energy. And when I recognize it as just a thought, it will be neutral or even slightly energize.

Why is there an experience of drained energy? I imagine it comes from the image of an “I” or “me” struggling with the wider world, in different ways. Just taking that image as real and true will give an experience of energy drain, tiredness, and at times even exhaustion.

Said another way, the sense of drained energy happens because of the usual should vs is/may be conflicts. Any belief is a should, which automatically will be in conflict with life as it is shows up or may show up. This creates stress and tension, which in turn gives an experienced of energy drain.

It is simple, and – as usual – it comes with lots of wrinkles.

For instance…..

When I recognize a thought as a thought, there may be a joy in this recognition, and the freedom in using stories as tools, which can give a slight sense of energy boost.

A belief may boost energy as well, especially when life lines up with the should. But it tends to feel a little compulsive, and as soon as life goes in a different direction, the belief that gave energy may now drain energy.

This energy drain is not initially a physical energy drain. It is mental, although it will – especially over time – be mirrored in the body.

And there are many ways the dynamics around beliefs unfold. Far too many to explore in depth here.

I may try to fuel and elaborate a story, to bolster and defend it. I may try to resist it by fueling contrary stories. I may want to distract myself from a story. Beliefs fuel emotions, and I may try to resist or hold onto these. I may interpret symptoms in a way that creates stress and discomfort. I may have stressful stories about the past, future, or present. Beliefs want attention, so they tend to return over and over.

Each of these can easily lead to an experience of energy drain.

So what can I do?

The answer is the usual one for me:

As soon as I notice a sense of energy drain, I can take that as a reminder. First, to allow experience as is, with kindness. Can I be with what I am experiencing right now? And then notice what beliefs are stressful for me right now (these may be behind the energy drain), and inquire into those beliefs to find what is more honest for me.

I can also use any number of first-aid techniques to shift back into more energy. I can take a nap. I can eat something to boost my energy and mood. I can do something that is energizing and enjoyable to me, such as going for a walk, play with a kid or an animal, do energizing yoga, jump up and down, go outside and take photographs, talk with a friend, and so on.

…………………..
…………………..
…………………..

  • thought and energy
    • thoughts drain energy or energize – depending on how relate to + content
    • take the story as true = stress, drain
    • also
      • rumination – happens when believe in
      • interpretation of symptoms
      • anticipation
      • should vs is/may be conflicts

The thoughts may return over and over, wanting to be seen and for us to find what is more honest for us.

Taking a story as true brings attention to the story. And when attention is there, it can lead to resistance to or fueling of the stories. At times, we may fuel thoughts that elaborate and support our initial stories, trying to build them up or defend them. Or thoughts may return over and over, and we either resist them, or fuel and elaborate on them, or both. Either way, there may be an experience of energy drain.

………………..

draft……

Thoughts can drain energy or energize, depending on how we relate to them, and depending on their content.

In general, when I take a story as true, it will drain my energy. And when I recognize it as just a thought, it will be neutral or even slightly energize.

Why does a belief drain energy? Because of the usual should vs is/may be conflicts. A belief is a should, which automatically will be in conflict with life as it is shows up or may show up. This creates stress and tension, which in turn gives an experienced of energy drain.

There are many ways this happens.

Taking a story as true brings attention to the story. And when attention is there, it can lead to resistance to or fueling of the story. I may fuel thoughts trying to prove the initial belief wrong. I may fuel thoughts that elaborate and support my initial stories, trying to build them up or defend them. And beliefs also tend to return over and over, and I either resist them, or fuel and elaborate on them, or both. Either way, there may be an experience of energy drain.

Beliefs tend to trigger emotions. If I tell myself the emotions are undesirable, I may try to resist them and push them away, and if I tell myself the emotions are desirable, I may try to amplify them or make them stay around longer. Both of these may lead to an experience of drained energy.

I may interpret symptoms in ways that drains energy, for instance by telling myself it means something that I don’t want in my life.

And I may anticipate something happening that I don’t want, and just thinking about it drains energy.

Additional notes:

When I recognize a thought as a thought, there may be a joy in this recognition, and the freedom in using stories as tools, which can give a slight sense of energy boost.

I may get energy from a belief as well, especially when life lines up with my shoulds. But it tends to feel a little compulsive, and as soon as life goes in a different direction, the belief that gave energy may now drain energy.

This energy drain is not initially a physical energy drain. It is mental, although it will – especially over time – be mirrored in the body.

Why is there an experience of drained energy? I imagine it comes from the image of an “I” or “me” struggling with the wider world, in different ways. Just taking that image as real and true will give an experience of energy drain, tiredness, and perhaps even exhaustion.

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.