Acknowleding the truth in beliefs

 

Practices seem to emerge on their own, in their own time, and often as a quiet redirection of curiosity.

Over the last few weeks, one of my practices has been to find the genuine truth in my beliefs.

It may sound funny. Most of the time, I explore beliefs by noticing whether I can know if they are absolutely true, paying attention to their effects, imagine who I would be without the belief, and finding the genuine validity in its reversals (The Work).

Now, it seems time to also find the genuine truth in the initial belief, especially the central and long lasting ones. And as with the other facets of the exploration, there is a sense of relief when I do this, a sense of coming home.

Each story has a grain of truth in it. And it seems that this genuine grain of truth in beliefs is difficult to notice.

Taking a story as true makes it difficult. When I explore my own experience, I find two ways beliefs masks the genuine validity in the story.

First, when I take a story as true, thoughts has to make it appear true. And they will use any strategy available, including exaggeration, dismissing the validity in other views, and so on. I know this happens. I am familiar with it, even if I don’t want to admit it to myself. So I don’t trust the belief. One the one hand, I try to think, feel, and act as if it is true. And on the other hand, I am suspicious of it.

And at the same time, there is stress inherent in any belief. It will always be at odds with my stories of what is or may be. So there is ambivalence towards the story. It appears true, and yet it is stressful. It is slightly uncomfortable to face it, which makes it difficult to allow the sincere truth in it to sink in.

After exploring my beliefs through the four questions and the turnarounds (The Work), some – or perhaps all – of the charge goes out of it. It is easier to find that I really don’t know, and the validity in its reversals. And this makes it easier to acknowledge the genuine validity in the initial belief. I can allow it to sink in. Feel it. See it. Even find appreciation for it.

There is a particular beauty to this type of truths, because it is often very ordinary.

I made a mistake.

Hm. I cannot know I made a mistake. It feels that way, my stories sometimes tells me it is true. But it is just a feeling. Just an opinion.

I didn’t make a mistake. I can see that too. I acted on what seemed best at the time. Something good came out of it, and I can find specific examples. Hopefully, I learned something from it.

And finally….

Yes, I did make a mistake. If I could go back, I would have made a different choice. It feels good to acknowledge that. Since I have found that I cannot know, and that it also was not a mistake, it is much easier to acknowledge that yes – I did also make a mistake. That is an honest and valid way to look at it. And there is a great sense of relief in allowing this to sink in.

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Practices seem to emerge on their own, in their own time.

Over the last few weeks, one of my practices has been to find the genuine truth in my beliefs.

It may sound funny. Most of the time, I explore beliefs by noticing whether I can know if they are absolutely true, paying attention to their effects, imagine who I would be without the belief, and finding the genuine validity in its reversals.

Now, it seems time to also find the genuine truth in beliefs, especially the central and long lasting ones. And as with the other facets of the exploration, there is a sense of relief when I do this, a sense of coming home.

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draft…..

There is something powerful in acknowledging the truth in a story. It is always a partial truth, fleshed out by the validity in numerous other stories including its reversals. And yet, when I allow the validity of any story to sink in, there is a shift. There is a sense of coming home.

And that goes for the truth in my own beliefs as well. Quite often, I don’t sincerely acknowledge the truth in my own beliefs.

I may take a story as true. I may feel, think, and act as if it is true.

And at the same time, there is stress inherent in any belief. It will always be at odds with my stories of what is or may be. So there is ambivalence towards the story. It appears true, and yet it is stressful. It is slightly uncomfortable to face it. It is difficult to allow the sincere truth in it to sink in.

Maybe more importantly, I don’t quite trust the truth in my own beliefs. When I take a story as true, my thoughts are obliged to make it appear true. They will do whatever it takes, including exaggeration, emphasizing what seems to support it, disregarding the rest, and so on. I know the process, even if I don’t always admit it to myself. So although I pretend to believe a story, I also don’t believe it. I don’t quite trust my own beliefs, so I don’t allow myself to allow the quiet truth in it to sink in.

So after going through an inquiry into one of my beliefs, finding that I don’t know if my initial story is true, and allowing the validity in its reversals to sink in, I often find it helpful to acknowledge the genuine truth in my initial belief.

Sincere there is less stress around that story, I can now allow the quiet truth in it to sink in. I can feel it. Feel something shifting in me. And there is often a sense of another release. Of coming home. A deeper sense of peace around it.

I used to deny the validity in my own belief, because I didn’t trust it, and it was stressful. So there is a sense of relief in more sincerely acknowledging the truth in it, allowing it to sink in. I don’t have to fight it anymore.

Part of the beauty here is in the ordinariness of what I find.

I made a mistake. Yes, I did make a mistake. If I could go back, I would have made a different choice. It feels good to acknowledge that. I am human. I make mistakes. I am sometimes marked by it. If I am lucky, I may learn something from it. Since I have already found that I cannot know, and that it also was not a mistake, it is much easier to acknowledge that yes – I did also make a mistake. That is an honest and valid way to look at it. And there is a great sense of relief in allowing this to sink in.

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  • acknowledging the truth in beliefs
    • beliefs, keep returning
      • several reasons
      • belief = friction between our stories of what is and what should be
      • so an invitation to explore, inquire into, resolve
      • makes sense evolutionary, and also invitation to heal/mature and -eventually – awaken
    • pushing away
      • belief – the emotions triggered by it + its story, images, what it means to me
      • reversals + don’t know (what doesn’t fit the belief, if taken as exclusive viewpoint)
    • instead, allow, welcome
      • see, feel the belief + emotions, and acknowledge its validity, the truth in it
      • and also its reversals, and that i don’t know
    • in each case, a sense of coming home
      • confession
      • release
    • if one or the other, still a knot there
      • if only see, feel, appreciate the truth in the belief
      • or in its reversals + don’t know
      • still something more there, so attention will be drawn to it
    • the work, invitation to do both
      • initial belief
        • allow, see, feel the emotions + its images/stories
        • find validity and truth in the initial belief
      • reversals – same (see, feel, find validity in)
      • don’t know – who i would be if recognize don’t know

– when have a belief, resist the truth in it b/c is stressful
– so is a relief to acknowledge the truth in it
– a sense of coming home, release
–  acknowledge the truth, see it – w. specific examples, feel it, allow it to sink in

– believe a story, but at the same time don’t want to believe it b/c it is stressful, so there is a struggle w. the belief
– find the genuine truth in it (often ordinary human truth, from conventional view)

– sometimes when do inquiry, the truth in the belief remains undigested, unacknowledged, so also partially unresolved

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  • pushing away
    • pushing away
      • pushing away the belief
        • uncomfortable emotions , story
      • pushing away its reversals + don’t know
    • instead, welcome
      • see, feel the belief + anything around it
      • acknowledge its validity, the truth in it
    • …..

…………..

  • wanting to be seen, felt
    • beliefs coming up
      • wanting to be seen, felt
      • deeply feel how the world appears from that viewpoint, allow it to sink in, acknowledge the validity in it
    • also, find the validity in its reversals
      • see, feel
    • it comes up for both reasons
      • wants to be seen, felt, its validity acknowledged
      • and the same for its reversals, for a richer set of stories about whatever topic it’s about
      • sometimes: can be stuck in an in between place, pushing away the belief + the reversals + don’t know
    • and when seen, felt, may shift into genuine appreciation

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About half of the posts I start here are not published, mostly because they are special examples of more general patterns. Since I have already written about the more general patterns, they are – in a way – a given, so it feels even more redundant to write about them than usual…! But it may be good for me to finish and publish a few of those. So here is one.

……………..

There is something powerful in acknowledging the truth in a story. It is always a partial truth, fleshed out by the validity in numerous other stories including its reversals. And yet, when I allow the validity of any story to sink in, there is a shift. There is a sense of coming home.

And that goes for the truth in my own beliefs as well. Quite often, I don’t sincerely acknowledge the truth in my own beliefs.

I may take a story as true. I may feel, think, and act as if it is true. And at the same time, there is stress inherent in any belief. It will always be at odds with my stories of what is or may be. So there is ambivalence towards the story. It appears true, and yet it is stressful. It is slightly uncomfortable to face it.

………………

I may take a story as true. I may feel, think, and act as if it is true.

And at the same time, there is stress inherent in any belief. It will always be at odds with my stories of what is or may be. So there is ambivalence towards the story. It appears true, and yet it is stressful. It is slightly uncomfortable to face it. It is difficult to allow the sincere truth in it to sink in.

Whenever I take a story as true, my thoughts are obliged to make my belief appear true. They will do whatever it takes, including exaggeration, one-sidedness, excluding the validity in reversals, and much more. And I know that. I know the process. So I don’t quite trust the truth in my own beliefs.

………………

The first question in The Work is is it true? It is an invitation to notice that I cannot know my story is true. And yet, it is also an invitation to find the sincere truth in it. To notice it. Find examples. Allow it to sink in.

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3 thoughts to “Acknowleding the truth in beliefs”

  1. Awakening is ongoing process.cultural conditioning is very deep.what is ultimate truth is also debated but it exists without our opinions and perspectives.your blogs have openeness without rigidity.we live with wisdom and love in harmony with whatever surrounds us.Thanks for your sharing.

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