Objectifying

 

Feminists brought one form of objectification to our attention: When women are objectified, they become a thing in the mind’s of men. In this case, a thing that can get us what we want.

Any thought or image is a cartoon, a simplification. That’s its nature, and it can be very helpful in orienting and navigating in the world. There is no problem here. It’s not even a real objectification if the image is recognized as an image and not something “out there” and inherent in the world.

It’s first when I take the thought or image as true  – a true representation, or as the thing itself – that this objectification happens. That’s when I find I objectify whatever the thought is about, whether it is another person, myself, the world, or reality/God.

And this objectification has two layers to it. I first take my image of boundaries as true. There is really something there with an inside and outside, a thing, an object. And I take my image of its characteristics as true. It’s really a human being, a woman, 30s, attractive etc. So in this way, taking my images as true creates my world. It makes my images – my interpretations and stories – appear very real and true.

I create objects in my own mind, and take them as true.

Some examples:

I believe I need her, and she becomes an object for me, something to fix me. She becomes a cartoon character in my mind, with only a limited set of characteristics, and I (temporarily) believe she is this cartoon character. There is a sense of separation and struggle. And this quite simple thought rests on several layers of underlying thoughts: There is an “I” here, who is a man, not complete in himself, who can be completed by this woman. And there is a woman there who is just right to complete this man, I. All of those are images taken as true, creating objects that appear true, and from there creating certain experiences, feelings, choices, actions, and a certain life.

I believe I am smart, or I am, or just I. And I become an object for myself.

I believe God is good, and God becomes an object for me. Limited, small.

In each case, the belief makes what’s objectified neatly wrapped up and manageable. There is less receptivity to whatever doesn’t fit the image. My perception is limited, and my options for how to relate to what’s objectified is limited.

And when I investigate these images I hold as true, I find a shift. I may find compassion for the other person and myself. A sense of connection. Receptivity. Curiosity. Freedom to be more authentic.

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  • objectifying
    • any thought/image, a cartoon – simplified etc.
      • can be very helpful in orienting, navigating
    • when taken as true, then objectify (a) that it refers to something and (b) it’s characteristics
        • makes the boundaries appear real, inside/outside etc.
        • makes it’s characteristics appear real
      • other people, myself, the world, reality/god
      • effects: makes it small, packaged, a conclusion
      • happens not only when men objectify women (make her a thing, in this case that can do something for me), but any time i take a story as true
    • ………

 

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  • objectifying
    • when believe any thought, objectify others, the world, myself, reality/god
    • prevents heart connection, receptivity, intimacy
    • examples
      • i need her – she becomes an object for me, prevents heart connection
      • i am smart, i am, i – i become an object for myself
      • god is good – god becomes an object for me, limited, small
    • what happens
      • what’s objectified becomes small, limited, packaged up, manageable
      • less receptivity, intimacy, sense of connection
      • less receptivity to what doesn’t fit the image
    • ……

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draft…..

When I believe a thought, I find I objectify whatever the thought is about – another person, myself, the world, reality/God.

I believe I need her, and she becomes an object for me, something to fix me. She becomes a cartoon character in my mind, with only a limited set of characteristics, and I believe she is this cartoon character. There is a sense of separation and struggle.

I believe I am smart, or I am, or just I. And I become an object for myself.

I believe God is good, and God becomes an object for me. Limited, small.

In each case, what’s objectified becomes small, limited, packaged up, manageable. It becomes a cartoon character with limited characteristics. There is less receptivity to whatever doesn’t fit the image I hold in my mind. My perception is limited, and my options for how to relate to what’s objectified is limited.

If the thought is not taken as true, through for instance investigation, I notice a shift into compassion for the other person and myself. A sense of connection. Receptivity. Curiosity. I am free to be more authentic. I am free to take care of myself. I am free to act in whatever way seems kind. I know my image is an image.

Note: It’s common to see that men may objectify women. They become a thing that can give pleasure or “fix” a man. And I see that’s what happens whenever I take any image of anyone or anything as true. It becomes an object that can or cannot do something for me. Nothing wrong in that, but it’s good to notice what happens, the effects, and what’s there if the image is recognized as an image.

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Any thought or image is a cartoon, a simplification. That’s its nature, and it can be very helpful in orienting and navigating in the world.

 

 

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One thought to “Objectifying”

  1. Smashing out of the ego box and having wings to Soar
    Umlimited and free, thanks for writing this, it released some
    Tears at the truth of it that rings true , you are so honest,and authentic
    You beauty of Soul shines through…

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