The Wild

 

As Adyashanti points out in Resurrecting Jesus, the Jesus story is a teaching story. It reflect the universal awakening process, which is the awakening process for each of us. In the Jesus story, the actions of each person reflects a dynamic in us, and each event reflect a signpost in our own journey.

When Jesus goes to John the Baptist, it can be seen as Jesus seeking out the wild.

He has, most likely, learned the conventional spiritual traditions well, and has reached a point in his own journey where he needs to go outside of conventions. It doesn’t necessarily mean rejecting traditions, but it does mean receptivity to learning outside of the conventional.

Also, as or more importantly, it means receptivity to go outside of what’s familiar to ourselves. As we grow and mature, and as life recognizes new facets of itself, we – by definition – go beyond what’s familiar to us. We enter what to us is the wild, the uncharted.

The wild, the unbounded, always works on us. And at some point, there is the invitation to recognize this, and allow it in a more conscious way.

And yes, Jesus may have sought out the wild in both of these ways long before he met John the Baptist. This encounter is just a reminder of the role of the wild in an awakening process.

………….
………….
………….

draft…..

As Adyashanti points out in Resurrecting Jesus, the Jesus story is the story of each of our awakening process. Each person reflect us, and each event reflect a signpost in our own journey.

When Jesus goes to John the Baptist, it can be seen as Jesus seeking out the wild.

He has, most likely, learned the conventional spiritual traditions well, and has reached a point in his own journey where he needs to go outside of conventions. It doesn’t mean rejecting traditions, just to be receptive to learning outside of the conventional.

Also, as or more importantly, it means receptivity to go outside of what’s familiar to ourselves. As we grow and mature, and as life recognizes new facets of itself, we – by definition – go beyond what’s familiar to us. We enter what to us is the wild, the uncharted.

The wild, the unbounded, always works on us. And at some point, there is the invitation to allow this in a more conscious way.

And yes, Jesus may have sought out the wild in both of these ways long before he met John the Baptist. This encounter is just a reminder of the role of the wild in an awakening process.

………….

Similarly, the wild is what’s revealed when we see through our assumptions and stories about ourselves and life. It’s what’s naturally unbound.

And this wilderness is perhaps our most important teacher. Untouched nature (although nothing is really untouched by humans at this point), and reality unbound by our assumptions and ideas, are very important teachers to us.

…………

Also, as or more importantly, it means receptivity to go outside of what’s familiar to ourselves. If we want to open to something new to us, that’s by definition outside of and different from what we already know and are familiar with.

 

………….

– jesus, john the baptist, at some point in the process leave the constraints of the tradition, receptivity to learning outside of the conventions,
– wilderness, resetting for us, nurturing, see ourselves in perspective, allowing it to work on us
– see through words and images, reveal what’s here
– the wild, not constrained by shoulds, identities, identifications (follow guidance, kindness, fluidity)

………….

As Adyashanti points out in Resurrecting Jesus, the Jesus story is the story of each of our awakening process. Each person reflect us, and each event reflect a signpost in our own journey.

When Jesus goes to John the Baptist, it can be seen as Jesus seeking out the wild. (a) He has, most likely, learned the conventional spiritual traditions well, and has reached a point in his own journey where he needs to go outside of conventions. It doesn’t mean rejecting traditions, just to be receptive to learning outside of the conventional. (b) Also, as or more importantly, it means receptivity to go outside of what’s familiar to ourselves. If we want to open to something new to us, that’s by definition outside of and different from what we already know and are familiar with.

Similarly, the wild is what’s revealed when we see through our assumptions and stories about ourselves and life. It’s what’s naturally unbound.

And this wilderness is perhaps our most important teacher. Untouched nature (although nothing is really untouched by humans at this point), and reality unbound by our assumptions and ideas, are very important teachers to us.

 

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.