Balancing striving with allowing

 

Some traditional spiritual teachings and practices emphasize going and being somewhere else. They can be a bit pushy and striving, and rest on assumptions that what’s here is not “good enough”. Even when love, body and Earth is included, this too is sometimes done in a slightly pushy and striving way. Without inclusion of it’s counterpart, allowing, this can lead to burnout.

So it can be helpful to balance it with a more allowing approach. One that includes love for what’s here, caring for all our experiences and parts, gentleness, nourishment, receptivity, connection with the soil and the Earth, and a gentle inclusion of the body.

And we see this transition in our culture today. There is a growing emphasis on finding love for what is. Notice it’s already allowed and welcome. Notice that what we may see as troublesome aspects of ourselves are here to protect us, are well intentioned, and come from love. Notice – and enjoy – the relief in this approach.

The two approaches complement and support each other. Allowing gives a more true and restful context for striving. Striving happens within and as allowing. And allowing striving makes the allowing more alive, dynamic and aligned with reality. Striving is allowed, along with whatever else is here.

Both are here anyway. There is a dynamic impulse, and it’s all already allowed. So why not consciously include both?

And are they really here as they initially appear? What do I find when I look for striving or allowing? Can I find either, outside of words, images and sensations?

I initially called this post balancing a masculine approach, and wrote this:

Traditional spiritual teachings and practices often – although not always – lean towards the masculine. They are often head centered, with possibly some heart and belly. Sometimes, even the heart and belly practices are done in a more masculine way. If it’s too unbalanced, it can lead – very understandably – to burnout.

It can be good to balance these out with a more feminine approach, including….. love, caring, gentleness, nourishment, receptivity, connection with the soil and the Earth, and a gentle inclusion of the body.

Note: I usually don’t write about it in this way. It doesn’t quite make sense. What does masculine and feminine really mean? It appears to be a convenient shorthand, but breaks down as soon as we take a closer look. Really….. it’s all about how we approach it, and if we include love, gentleness, nourishment and connection with the Earth and body, then our approach tends to be more balanced. It’s more nourishing. More alive in a quiet and grounded way.

 

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notes….

– traditional teachings/practices, often more masculine (not always)
– balance with a more feminine approach…. love, caring, gentleness, nourishment, receptivity

– pushy, striving, attempting to go/be somewhere else, attempting to “better” oneself,
– vs. receptivity, allowing, notice what i am seeking is already here,

– traditions from more patriarchal cultures (which most larger cultures around the world have been for a few thousand years)

One is not inherently “better” than the other. They complement and support each other. Pushiness without allowing can lead to burnout. Allowing without allowing striving too can be a bit onesided and stagnant.

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draft…..

Traditional spiritual teachings and practices often – although not always – lean towards the masculine. They are often head centered, with possibly some heart and belly. Sometimes, even the heart and belly practices are done in a more masculine way. If it’s too unbalanced, it can lead – very understandably – to burnout.

It can be good to balance these out with a more feminine approach, including….. love, caring, gentleness, nourishment, receptivity, connection with the soil and the Earth, and a gentle inclusion of the body.

Note: I usually don’t write about it in this way. It doesn’t quite make sense. What does masculine and feminine really mean? It appears to be a convenient shorthand, but breaks down as soon as we take a closer look. Really….. it’s all about how we approach it, and if we include love, gentleness, nourishment and connection with the Earth and body, then our approach tends to be more balanced. It’s more nourishing. More alive in a quiet and grounded way.

 

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