Examining space

 

I have explored space more lately, both in my own experience and in working with clients.

Notice the space around the sensation. Notice the space the sensations happen within, and the space around and within the sensations. Notice the space around the image and between you and the image. Notice the space between the letters of the words, around the words, between you and the words.

Also, is there a sense of a boundary to the space? If there is a sense of a boundary, examine that boundary. Is there an image of a boundary? If so, look at that image. Is that an actual boundary? If yes, what makes it seem a real boundary? Is it a sensation? If so, feel that sensation. (And so on.)

I heard a good analogy a few days ago: If you put a teaspoon of salt in a small glass of water, it’s almost too intense to drink. If you put the same teaspoon in a big bucket of water or a lake, it’s fine. It’s more diluted.

Something similar happens when we notice the boundless space around something that seems to have a strong charge to it: a physical contraction, emotional or physical pain, a strong emotion, cravings and more. When I notice the space it happens within, the space within it, and that it’s the same space, its intensity is “diluted”. It becomes more manageable, and there is also more “space” to examine it further.

Also, if unexamined, a physical contraction or pain may seem very solid, real, and dense. By noticing the space it’s happening within, the space within it, and that it’s the same space, my experience of it shifts. It seems less dense. And if it seemed a problem or a threat, then it may seem less like a problem or threat. Again, there is more “space” to examine it further.

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Initial notes……

  • boundless space outside/inside of body + sensations
  • “dilutes” our experience of contractions, discomfort, emotional/physical pain etc.
  • just like a teaspoon of salt is intense in a small glass of water, but OK in a large bucket of water or a lake

 

 

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