Chronic fatigue and spirituality

 

I have wondered about CFS and spirituality. It does seem that more people with CFS are into spirituality than average. It may be that people with CFS get into spirituality as a way to deal with it. Or that there is another connection. For instance, it’s possible that both CFS and getting into spirituality has to do with a wish to find refuge or escape from this world. That may be part of it for me as well. (And that doesn’t mean that spirituality can be reduced to wishing to finding refuge or escaping.)

From a previous post.

In my case, I got CFS at age 15 a few months after mononucleosis. There was a sense of the world becoming very far away, my head felt filled with cotton, I was severely fatigued, my brain didn’t work properly. (I didn’t think of it as CFS then, but looking back the label fits.) After about a year, there was a spontaneous opening or awakening where everything without exception was revealed as God, Spirit, consciousness, love. And that opening never really closed down. The CFS continued, although I learned to regulate it more following high school, and it was compensation for by my passion for what I did.

I then got severe CFS again some years ago, and a few months after pneumonia. (I was bedridden for 3 weeks and terribly sick. My doctor called it “walking pneumonia”! I normally don’t like to take medicines, but at that time I strongly felt I needed it, but my doctor didn’t agree.)

In both of those phases of my life, I felt quite lost and off track. Initially, combined with or because of typical teenage angst. More recently because I found myself in a situation that didn’t feel right at all, and it felt difficult to get out of it. (Getting out of it in a real way meant I had to go against or confront some very core beliefs and fears.)

So it may be that CFS is connected with feeling off track. Or seeking refuge from a difficult situation or world. Or there may be personality characteristics – such as being highly sensitivie – that makes us both interested in spirituality and susceptible to CFS. Or that may just be the mind trying to make sense of things.

What’s more real is that CFS and other illnesses does bring up our fears, beliefs, and identifications, and we can look at these. It tends to bring up what’s unfelt, unloved, and unquestioned in us, with an invitation to us to feel it, find love for it, and question the stories behind or associated with it.

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