Love your enemy

 

Love your enemy.

I don’t see this as a commandment or even primarily morals.
It has more to do with healing my relationship to what I perceive as an enemy, whether it’s a person, a situation, an illness, a state of experience, or something else.
More accurately, it’s my mind healing it’s own relationship to it’s own imaginations.
When my mind perceives an enemy, there is an imagined separate self and an imagined “other” made into an enemy. And this is painful. My mind is in a futile struggle with itself. (I am not saying that “it’s all in the mind”, I am just focusing on how my mind creates its own experience.)
The alternative is for the mind to find love for it’s own imaginations, independent of what these imaginations are. This allows for reduced struggle and suffering, and relating to life in a more intentional, kind, and even more effective way.
So how can I love my enemy? Or rather, how can I remove the obstacles to love? How can I look through the appearance of an enemy?
I have found different forms of inquiry helpful (The Work, Living Inquiries). Along with releasing trauma from the body through therapeutic trembling (trauma can fuel anxiety and enemy images). And heart-centered practices such as ho’oponopono and tonglen.

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Initial draft…..

Love your enemy.

For me, this has not so much to do with a commandment or even ethics.
It has more to do with healing my relationship to what I perceive as an enemy, whether it’s a person, a situation, an illness, a state, or something else.
And really, it has to do with my mind healing it’s own relationship to it’s own imaginations.
When my mind perceives an enemy, there is an imagined separate self and an imagined “other” that then is made into an enemy. (I am not saying that “it’s all in the mind”, I am just focusing on how my mind creates its own experience.)
How can I love my enemy? Or, more accurately, how can I remove the obstacles to love, and how can I look through the appearance of an enemy?
I have found different forms of inquiry helpful, along with releasing trauma from the body through therapeutic trembling (trauma can fuel anxiety and enemy images), and heart-centered practices such as ho’oponopnop and tonglen.

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