Are religious people delusional?

 

Are religious people delusional? That’s a question addressed by a recent article in The Guardian.

It’s a complex question and, as usual, it depends. Here are a few angles.

In general, what’s common and shared in a culture is not seen as unusual or a problem. (Although people from another background and culture may well see it differently.) Common religious beliefs and behaviors won’t be seen as delusional, even by people who disagree or have another view. And since most human cultures accept religions, we tend to give religions and religious people more leeway than we do in other cases.

If religious views or behaviors seem too much out of the ordinary we are more likely to wonder what’s going on. The views may be stronger than usual. Their views or behavior may be out of the ordinary. Their identity may be seen as unusual. And that may be considered a disorder or delusional.

Mystical experience is a subset of what I just mentioned. Some religious traditions and cultures accept mystical experiences (Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism), and some see it as more unusual  (Protestant Christianity). In the latter, mystical experiences may be viewed with more suspicion although it depends on how the person interpret their own experiences.

In general, from a mainstream psychological view, it depends on how the person views their own beliefs and experiences. If they have a reasonably rational and mature relationship to it, and their interpretations are not too much out of the ordinary, they are likely to be seen as sane. If they seem to have unusually strong beliefs, or very unusual interpretations, they are more likely to be seen as delusional.

I understand this approach. As social and group creatures, we absorb the views and norms of our culture. And whatever is ordinary is also normal and generally seen as sane. And yet, it’s possible to take a more dispassionate view. We can take a step back and imagine we see it from the outside.

From a more dispassionate view, I would say religious beliefs are delusional. If we adopt views and beliefs (a) unsupported by our own experience and solid data, (b) just because someone else holds them, that is – in a strict sense – delusional. It may be understandable and ordinary but also delusional. It makes about as much sense as believing in Santa Claus.

So why don’t psychologists see religious beliefs as delusional? There are many reasons. Mainly, the beliefs are understandable and ordinary and they want to give people some leeway. Also, they don’t want to antagonize large groups of people. And if religious beliefs are seen as delusional, then any belief will have to be seen as delusional.

And, of course, that’s actually true. When we hold our own imagination – which our thoughts are – as representing reality in any final or absolute sense, then we are delusional. Any belief is, in a strict sense, delusional. That’s why it’s also stressful. It’s out of alignment with reality.

Fortunately, there is a way out. And that way may include many forms of explorations including various forms of meditation, heart-centered practices, body-inclusive practices, and inquiry.

Perhaps in the future or in some society somewhere else in the universe, the norm is to take thoughts for what they are. As imagination only helpful in a practical sense to help us orient and navigate in the world. And not as a pointer to any final or absolute truth or reality. In such a society, religious belief – as any other belief – may be seen as delusional. Understandable but delusional.

Just to make it clear: I am talking about religious belief here. Not necessarily spirituality. Spirituality – as anything else – can and does get mixed in with beliefs. But it can also be a more open and pragmatic exploration. It can be a reporting on direct experiences, in an as honest way as possible. It can be a practical exploration through using pointers and practices to see what we find. It can be an exploration of reality, just as (other forms of) science. And that can be done outside of or (sometimes) within a religious context.


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Initial notes……

  • are religious people delusional?
    • depends on who, what, definition etc.
    • generally
      • what’s common, shared, not seen as unusual or a problem (no matter what it is)
        • anything shared in the culture will be seen as ordinary, not a problem
      • if similar but not shared, that may seen as delusional
        • e.g. mystical experiences etc. if not familiar in the culture / to the one observing it
      • if hold a belief, then may see that as a delusion, take a thought to reflect actual reality
        • which we all do in different ways, to different extent
      • if hold something as true just because someone told you, that can be seen as delusional
        • bc don’t check it, don’t examine for yourself
      •  if stronger than what’s common, then may be seen as delusional
        • if stronger belief + act more radically bc of it
      • may be based on direct personal experience, an interpretation of this experience
        • the experience itself real, of course
        • interpretation depends on culture etc.
        • and if get too caught up in the interpretation, can be seen as delusional
    • also, may chose to not see religions as delusional for strategic reasons, to not antagonize a lot of people
    • ….

https://www.theguardian.com/science/brain-flapping/2017/sep/21/why-religious-belief-isnt-a-delusion-in-psychological-terms-at-least

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In general, what’s common and shared in a culture is not seen as unsual or a problem. It won’t be seen as delusional. (Although people from another background and culture may well see it as delusional.) Common religious beliefs and behaviors won’t be seen as delusional, even by people who disagree or have another view.

If a person’s religious views or behaviors seem out of the ordinary, it may well be seen as delusional. (Although they will be given some leeway if a culture decides religious views and behaviors in general are OK and not delusional.) The views may be stronger than usual. The behavior may be out of the ordinary. Their identity may be seen as unusual. And that may be considered a disorder or delusional.

One subset of what I just mentioned is mystical experiences. If mystical experiences are accepted, then it won’t be seen as out of the ordinary. Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism tend to be open for mystical experiences of different types. But if mystical experiences are more unusual, as in Protestant Christianity, then it will be out of the ordinary and can even be seen as delusional. It also depends on how the person interprets the mystical experiences. If they have an open interpretation, they will tend to appear more sane (at least in our modern culture). And if they have strong and slightly unusual interpretations, others are more likely to wonder if it’s delusional.

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