Working on oneself

 

At a small gathering of Vortex healers, the senior healer mentioned that she rarely works on herself and added, “I don’t have time, too many clients”. A few things came up for me about this:

This is – in my experience – not typical for the Vortex Healing community. Most I know use Vortex Healing to work on themselves quite extensively, both as maintenance and to clear deep personal, ancestral, and karmic material.

Saying “I don’t have time” – as most of us do now and then – is a polite way of saying “I don’t prioritize it”. I try to make it a practice of being honest about this so when I notice the impulse to say “I don’t have time” I change it to “it’s not a priority for me”. I may not say either out loud, but I say it to myself so I can see what’s going on. It can feel harsh, but it’s honest, and the truth shall set us free.

Finally, I tend to be drawn to approaches that benefit both myself and clients. Tools I can use for myself and others, and that benefits me even as I work with clients. Vortex Healing is a good example of these type of tools. Now that I have some time, at least for a few weeks, I find myself using Vortex Healing for myself for several hours each day. (So far, I have worked on chronic fatigue, clearing energy pathways, digestion, possible infections, possible inflammation, misophonia, lungs, throat chakra, shoulder tension, karmic hooks, and a few other things.)

It’s important to find a balance between working on oneself and the rest of life, and now that I have more time, it feels like a valuable opportunity to take some time for myself.

How does Vortex benefit me as I work on a client? The energy flows through me so my system opens up and is energized. Also, there is an element of service, of doing what’s needed in the moment.

Getting our priorities straight when it comes to health

 

Some friends of mine are having a microwave discussion on facebook. Will it kill you? Is it harmless?

My approach is simple: Focus on the simple things we know have a big impact on health. It may be less exiting than conspiracy theories, but works better.

Eat your fruits and vegetables. Exercise. Nurture nurturing relationships. Enjoy life.

If I want to take the next step, it is to organize my life to reduce time spent driving, and walk, bike, or take public transportation instead. It is more enjoyable, gives me effortless exercise, and removes me from an activity that is far more risky than almost anything else we do. (I have already done this, and rarely need to use a car.)

It is easy to get distracted by minor concerns, or scares unsupported by science or common sense (microwaved food and vaccines come to mind as examples). So it is good to get our priorities straight: focus your limited energy on the simple things that we know have a big effect.

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Comfort as priority

 

I listened to a CSS talk yesterday and a questioner brought up the topic of comfort. By looking at her own choices and actions in daily life, she could see that her main priority is comfort. (We can find our priorities by looking at our actual choices in daily life and where we spend our time and energy.)

Is it an obstacle? Yes, it can be, in all the obvious ways. By seeking comfort we may engage in mindless entertainment instead of practice, distractions instead of allowing experience and inquiring into beliefs, and so on.

But it can also be a gateway, an invitation for inquiry.

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Actions show what I act on, what is a priority for me

 

Again, it is quite simple and maybe obvious. And when I explore it in my own life, it can be very juicy.

My actions show what I act on. What I value. What I take as important. What is a priority to me.

Sometimes, it comes from a belief. Fear. Shoulds. Identifications.

And sometimes, it comes from my heart. Intuition. What is fulfilling to me.

When there is a release from the belief, there is freedom to act from my heart.

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