Moods in an awakening process

Halfdan Egedius, Lørdagskveld / Saturday Night

When I was in my teens and early twenties, moods were an important part of my life. And by moods, I mean moods with a profound sense of beauty, awe, immenseness, and timelessness.

Several situations would evoke these moods.

Being out in nature, and especially beautiful clouds moving across the sky, the always-changing sunrises and sunsets, the light Norwegian summer nights, and the infinity of the dark starry sky.

Literature, music, and visual art. For me, this was especially the visual art from the 1600s and 1800s, the literature of the late 1800s, the music of Arvo Pärt and others, the movies of Tarkovsky, the Deep Ecology of Arne Næss, and when Carl Sagan talks about how we are the local eyes, ears, thoughts, and feelings of the universe.

These moods would also come when I was absorbed in drawing and painting, and when I engaged in spiritual practices like the ongoing Jesus prayer, Christ meditation, tonglen, and meditation.

What are these moods? I suspect it has to do with connecting not only with the beauty inherent in everything but the divine in all. It’s a kind of stepping stone from separation consciousness to noticing what we are, and it can also be a side-effect of early awakening.

What’s the role of these moods? For me, they were a carrot to stay on course. They were part of what hooked me on art and spiritual practices.

Since then, these moods are less frequent, they are brief when they happen, and they are not nearly as central. Perhaps because I am more used to noticing what I am, and it’s become more familiar and part of daily life. I also recognize moods more clearly as something that comes and goes and that they don’t mean so much in themselves.

INITIAL DRAFT….

When I was in my teens and early twenties, moods were an important part of my life. And by moods, I mean moods with a deep sense of beauty, awe, immenseness, and timelessness. Being out in nature would evoke this, and especially beautiful sunrises and sunsets, beautiful Norwegian summer nights, and the infinity of the dark starry sky.

Literature and music would also evoke this. For instance Carl Sagan when he talked about how we are the local eyes, ears, thoughts, and feelings of the universe, some poetry, and the music of Arvo Pärt and others.

Drawing and painting, and praying (Jesus prayer, Christ meditation) and meditation would also evoke these moods.

What are these moods? I suspect it has to do with connecting not only with the beauty inherent in everything but the divine in all. It’s a kind of stepping stone from separation consciousness to noticing what we are, and it can also be a side-effect of early awakening.

What’s the role of these moods? For me, they were a carrot to stay on course.

Since then, these moods are less frequent and are not nearly as central. Perhaps because I am more used to noticing what I am, and it’s become more familiar and part of daily life. And I also recognize moods more clearly as something that comes and goes and that doesn’t mean so much in itself.

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