Bone broth

I have been using bone broth off and on for the last couple of decades after I shifted from a vegetarian to a flexitarian diet.

Bone broth is one of the things I have found that significantly and consistently improves my health and well-being. It helps with my energy level, digestion, cravings, and the CFS.

(Other things that help with my general well-being and energy levels are: good sleep, drinking plenty of water – often in the form of herbal infusions, eating nourishing foods in general, eating and drinking regularly, eating with the seasons, some adaptogenic herbs, Vortex Healing energizing, Breema, and generally learning to understand and follow the signals of my body.)

I started again with bone broth last week, after some months without taking it, and it’s easy to notice how it nourishes my body and fills up deeper layers of my energy system. 

I notice the familiar difference between chicken broth and beef broth. Beef broth fills up deeper layers of my system. (I am sure this is different for different people. I am often drawn to the stronger medicine.) 

Bone broth helps my digestion in an amazing way. My digestive system is much more stable and seems better able to deal with a range of foods.

I notice how I am less drawn to meat when I have bone broth. The ideal diet for my system seems to be bone broth from beef and otherwise eating low on the food chain. Ironically, bone broth makes it easier for me to eat a more vegetarian diet. 

And I notice how cravings – for sugar and other less-than-healthy foods – go away when I have bone broth daily. I even have a slight aversion to those foods, likely because my system is more balanced and nourished. 

I should mention that I have tried bone broth powder. It has some effect but not even close to the bone broth I make myself.

I typically cook beef bones for two or three days on low heat in a slow cooker, with some vinegar to draw out the nutrients. (Update: I now started to use a pressure cooker, and it seems a good time is 15-20 hours to get the nice dark golden color.)

There is another side to this. One of my issues in life is not feeling deeply nourished – both psychologically and physically. So the deep nourishment that comes from bone broth seems especially helpful and important to me. That’s also why I am drawn to practices like Breema that have a deeply nourishing quality. 

Note: The photos above are from beef bone broth cooked 15-20 hours in a pressure cooker. It’s smooth, rich, delicious, and feels deeply nurturing.

Note 2: Gelatin powder has a similar effect to bone broth, although not quite as deeply and richly nourishing. I take neutral (unflavored) gelatin powder in hot water, often in the morning. It doesn’t quite replace bone broth, but it’s a nice emergency measure when traveling or when I run out of bone broth before having made a new batch.


SECOND DRAFT

I have been using bone broth off and on for the last couple of decades, since I made my diet more flexible after some years with a more strict vegetarian diet.

Bone broth is one of the things I have found consistently helps with my energy level, digestion, CFS symptoms, and general well-being. (Along with sleep, some adaptogenic herbs, drinking lots of water, eating and drinking regularly, eating nourishing foods in general, Breema, and more.) 

Over the last few months, I didn’t have bone broth. I started again with bone broth a few days ago and can feel how it nourishes and fills up the deeper layers of my energy system. 

I notice the familiar difference between chicken broth and beef broth. Beef broth fills up deeper layers of my system. (I am sure this is different for different people. I am often drawn to the stronger medicine.) 

I notice how I am not much drawn to meat when I have bone broth. The ideal diet for my system seems to be bone broth from beef and otherwise eating low on the food chain. Ironically, bone broth helps me eat a mostly vegetarian diet. 

Bone broth helps my digestion in an amazing way. My digestive system seems much more able to deal with a range of foods when I have bone broth regularly.

And I again notice how cravings – for sugar and other less-than-healthy foods – go away when I have bone broth daily. I even have a slight aversion to those foods, likely because my system is more balanced and nourished. 

I should mention that I have tried bone broth powder, and it helps a bit but not nearly as much as when I make my own bone broth. I typically cook beef bones for 24-48 hours on low heat in a slow cooker, with some vinegar to draw out the nutrients from the bone. 

There is another side to this. One of my issues in life is not feeling deeply nourished – both psychologically and physically. So the deep nourishment that comes from bone broth seems especially helpful and important to me. That’s also why I am drawn to practices like Breema which also has a deeply nourishing quality. 

DRAFT

Bone broth 

I have been using bone broth off and on for the last couple of decades. (Maybe even longer?) 

It’s one of the things I have found consistently helps with my energy level and well-being, and also with the CFS symptoms. (Along with sleep, Breema, some adaptogenic herbs, drinking lots of water, eating and drinking regularly and avoiding anything cold, and eating nourishing foods in general.) 

Over the last few months, I didn’t have bone broth. I started again with bone broth a few days ago, and can feel how it nourishes and fills up the deeper layers of my energy system. 

I notice the familiar difference between chicken broth and beef broth. Beef broth fills up deeper layers of my system. (I am sure this is different for different people. I am often drawn to the stronger medicine.) 

I notice how I am not much drawn to meat when I have bone broth. The ideal diet for my system seems to be bone broth from beef and otherwise eating low on the food chain. Ironically, bone broth helps me eat a mostly vegetarian diet. 

And I again notice how cravings – for sugar and other less-than-healthy foods – goes away when I have bone broth daily. I even have a slight aversion for those foods, likely because my system is more balanced and nourished. 

I should mention that I have tried the bone broth powder some sell, and it helps a bit but not nearly as much as when I make my own bone broth. I typically cook beef bones for 12-24 hours on low heat in a slow cooker, with some vinegar to draw out the nutrients from the bone. 

And there is another side to this. One of my issues in life is to not feel deeply nourished – both psychologically and physically. So the deep nourishment that comes from bone broth seems especially helpful and important to me. That’s also why I am drawn to practices like Breema which also has a deeply nourishing quality. 

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