AI is not intelligent

I have written about artificial intelligence (AI) a few times, and I love exploring AI image generation.

There is a lot of discussion about AI these days so I thought I would write a few more words and try to ground it.

There are always hopes and fears about new technology. That’s just how we humans are, it seems. It’s good since it helps us think through things at the beginning of smaller and bigger revolutions in technology and society. Usually, things turn out not as good as we hope and not as bad as we fear.

The term AI is a misnomer. AI is not intelligent. It’s predictive. It’s predictive text, image generation, music generation, and so on. It’s based on what it is fed. It reflects what it’s fed. It churns out a kind of average based on what it’s fed.

I imagine that if we called it for what it is – predictive whatever – there would be far less exaggerated hopes and fears about it. It would appear more boring, ordinary, and just one more thing.

It can mimic what humans produce in some fields, and that’s why it appears intelligent. Some may think it’s intelligent, or even conscious, if they are seduced by appearances and don’t much about how it works.

AI will replace some human jobs. Especially jobs that don’t require too much like summarizing, writing simple generic texts, creating generic illustrations, and so on.

It will create new jobs. Some will create and train AI. Many will use some form of AI as an aid in their work just like they use other tools.

There is no reason to suspect it will replace humans on a large scale. It’s one of many tools we have developed and it will be used by humans as any other tool. It will be used to support, seed, and supplement human creativity and work. And some will use it in harmful ways, just like some use any tool in a harmful way.

When CGI came on the scene, some said it was the end of practical effects in movies and perhaps even human actors. That turned out to be far from reality. These days, movies typically use a combination of the two, and some movies replace some people (crowds and stunts) with CGI but there is little to no interest in replacing central actors.

In general, we humans love what’s created by nature and humans. We may be fascinated by digital creations. We may find it useful for some things. But we want what’s created by humans. That’s not going to change.

Image created by me and Midjourney


DRAFT

AI IS NOT INTELLIGENT

I have written about artificial intelligence (AI) a few times, and I love exploring AI image generation.

There is a lot of discussion about AI these days so I thought I would write a few more words and try to ground it.

There are always hopes and fears about new technology. That’s just how we humans are, it seems. It’s good since it helps us think through things at the beginning of smaller and bigger revolutions in technology and society. Usually, things turn out not as good as we hope and not as bad as we fear.

The term AI is a misnomer. AI is not intelligent. It’s predictive. It’s predictive text, image generation, music generation, and so on. It’s based on what it is fed. It reflects what it’s fed. It churns out a kind of average based on what it’s fed.

I imagine that if we called it for what it is – predictive whatever-it-is – there would be far less exaggerated hopes and fears about it. It would appear more boring, ordinary, and just one more thing.

It can mimic what humans produce in some fields, and that’s why it appears intelligent. Some may think it’s intelligent, or even conscious, if they are seduced by appearances and don’t much about how it works.

AI will replace some human jobs. Especially jobs that don’t require too much like summarizing, writing simple generic texts, creating generic illustrations, and so on.

It will create new jobs. Some will create and train AI. Many will use some form of AI as an aid in their work just like they use a number of other tools.

There is no reason to suspect it will replace humans on a large scale. It’s one of many tools we have developed. It will be used by humans as any other tool. It will be used to support, seed, and supplement human creativity and work.

When CGI came on the scene, some said it was the end of practical effects in movies and perhaps even human actors. That turned out to be far from reality. These days, movies use both CGI effects and practical effects and often a combination of the two, and some movies replace some people (crowds and stunts) with CGI but there is little to no interest in replacing central actors.

In general, we humans love what’s created by nature and humans. We may be fascinated by digital creations. We may find it useful for some things. But we want what’s created by humans. That’s not going to change.

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