Noticing is primary

Instagram gifted me this video from Mingyur Rinpoche (son of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche) this morning. (Was he the young teacher-in-training I had tea with in Kathmandu in the mid-90s? I somehow think it was.)

NOTICING IS PRIMARY

Yes, when it comes to different forms of meditation and mindfulness, noticing is primary.

The content – what’s noticed – is not important in that context.

It can be dullness, agitation, sadness, frustration, anger, joy, contentment, bliss, and so on, anything within the always-changing content of experience.

TRAINING STABLE ATTENTION

When I train a more stable attention, my attention is on something specific within the content of experience. For me, it’s usually the sensations of the breath at my nostrils, but it can be any other sensation, a mental image, and so on. Training a more stable attention also happens through mindful movement like yoga, tai chi, qigong, Breema, and so on.

Whatever else is going on in the content of experience is less important. It’s literally peripheral. (Althought depending on how my personality responds to it, it can trigger distractions.)

NOTICE & ALLOW

Basic meditation is to notice and allow what’s here, and really to notice it’s all already noticed and allowed and rest in and as that noticing.

The content of experience comes and goes and specifically what it is, or whether my personality happens to like it or not, is less important.

The coming and going, in itself, is worth noticing since it shows me that I am not fundamentally any of it.

NOTICING WHAT I AM

I may find myself as what content of experience happens within and as, perhaps amplified by pointers from Headless experiments, the Big Mind process, and so on.

Here too, the specific content of experience is not so important. It’s all what I not fundamentally am. It’s what my nature happens to form itself into.

AT DIFFERENT TIMES

Of course, this will look a bit different at different times of our exploration.

In the beginning, it’s often easier to explore these things if the content is generally more calm and our personality is generally OK with it. It makes it easier to not create distractions for ourselves. Mindful movement can be a great lead-in to meditation and inquiry for that reason.

After a while, it becomes more important to keep noticing through the changing content of experience, and through the metaphorical changing weather and occasional storms, and even if our personality doesn’t like it very much. It’s part of the exploration. It helps us do the same in daily life when storms happen. This often requires a more clear intention and resolve.

NOTICING WHAT IN ME DOESN’T WANT TO

A part of this is to notice the parts of me that don’t want to do this. The parts of me that are scared of it.

Notice and acknowledge they are here. Welcome them. Get to know them. Understand where they are coming from. See what they really need, and if I can give it to them here and now. See they are innocent, and are here to try to protect us. Make friends with them. Find appreciation for them, because they are here to help me and come from love for me, even if it’s confused love.

ONGOING EXPLORATION

Here too, there doesn’t seem to be any finishing line. It’s an ongoing exploration.

It happens here and now, or it doesn’t happen. (Until it does.) Ideas of past times it happened, or ideas of it happening in the future, are ideas and they don’t nourish any more than a menu of a delicious meal nourishes.


INITIAL DRAFT

Instagram gifted me this video from Mingyur Rinpoche (son of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche) this morning. (I think I had tea with him in Kathmandu in the mid-90s when I was there.)

Yes, when it comes to different forms of meditation and mindfulness, noticing is primary. The content – what’s noticed – is not important in that context. It can be dullness, agitation, sadness, frustration, anger, joy, contentment, bliss, and so on, anything within the always-changing content of experience.

If I train a more stable attention, my attention is on the sensations of the breath at my nostrils (or any other sensation, a mental image, and so on). Whatever else is going on in the content of experience is less important.

If I notice and allow what’s here – notice it’s already allowed and allowed – the content of experience comes and goes and specifically what it is, or whether my personality happens to like it or not, is less important. The coming and going, in itself, is worth noticing since it shows me that I am not fundamentally any of it.

If I notice what I more fundamentally am – including if I use pointers from the headless experiments and the Big Mind process – the content of experience is again not so important. It’s all what I not more fundamentally am. It’s what my nature happens to form itself into.

Of course, this will look a bit different at different times of our exploration.

In the beginning, it’s easier to explore these things if the content is generally more calm and our personality is generally OK with it. It makes it easier to not create distractions for ourselves.

After a while, it becomes more important to keep noticing through the content of experience, and through the metaphorical changing weather and occasional storms, and even if our personality doesn’t like it very much. It’s part of the exploration. It helps us do the same in daily life when storms happen. This often requires a more clear intention and resolve.

A part of this is to notice the parts of us that don’t want to do this. To notice and acknowledge they are here. Welcome them. Get to know them. Understand where they are coming from. See what they really need, and if I can give it to them here and now. See they are innocent, and are here to try to protect us. Make friends with them. Find appreciation for them.

Here too, there doesn’t seem to be any finishing line. It’s an ongoing exploration. It happens here and now, or not at all. (Until it does.)

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